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Smyrna/Clayton Sun-Times
  • Dessert-theater musical 'Waiting Around' at Smyrna Opera House March 2-4

  • Four wait staff deliver a hearty helping of humor, while poking fun and celebrating the restaurant business in the scrumptious dessert-theater musical “Waiting Around” at the Smyrna Opera House.


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  • Four wait staff deliver a hearty helping of humor, while poking fun and celebrating the restaurant business in the scrumptious dessert-theater musical “Waiting Around” at the Smyrna Opera House.
    Opening night is at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Mar. 3. Desserts will be served after the show and will include baked goods such as cookies, cakes, pies and fresh fruit.
    What to expect
    Penned by Harry Mayronne and directed by Eddie Cohee, “Waiting Around” tells the story of aspiring actors and actresses who pay the bills by waiting tables at a generic restaurant. The cast of four is comprised of Paul, who has been with the restaurant the longest (about two decades), joined by John and Linda, who’ve reached the point where they’re jaded with the restaurant biz.
    Then there’s Kane, the new girl. While her new co-workers dredge how the job takes a toll on their poor feet, the Fairy Godwaitress takes Kane under her glittery wings and assures her that she’s cutout for the job, telling her: “You are a waitress,” said overseeing director Pat Musto of Smyrna, who added each cast member is using their real first name in the show, in addition to assuming multiple roles in the musical.
    Musto, who also owns Talk of the Town Hair Stylists on North Market Street, says the cliché premise of the production delves deeper than the dream layers of the science fiction action film “Inception.”
    “They are actors playing actors who are waiting tables, who want to be actors,” said Musto. “So it’s kind of a conundrum there.”
    Additional characters in the show include appearances by none other than cooking gurus Emeril Lagasse, Martha Stewart and Julia Child. There’s an amusing scene in the show where “Martha and Julia are up onstage at the same time trying to out due each other,” Musto said. “It’s funny.”
    Broadway feel
    The tunes in the show offer an upbeat Broadway style, so much so that audiences will feel compelled to wave their jazz hands. The song “Management” jokes about the restaurant’s management being the “scapegoat” for everything that goes wrong at the venue.
    “They tell Kane, the new girl, if anything happens, you say, ‘Well, that’s management,’” Musto said.
    Above all, Musto feels the most compelling part of the production centers around the cast’s chemistry, which will land huge cool points with show goers.
    “They’re having fun and it will come across to the audience that they know each other,” she said. “I think an audience that sees that will have a much better time. Of course they’re trying really hard, but when they get up there, they’re acting relaxed.”
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