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Smyrna/Clayton Sun-Times
  • Kenton company recalls tainted cheese after death in California

  • Roos Foods of Kenton has recalled 16 varieties of packaged cheeses after the products were linked to a death in California and caused at least seven others in Maryland to fall ill.
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    • Brands of recalled cheeses:

      Mexicana: Cuajada En Terron, Cuajada/Cuajadita Cacera, Cuajada Fresca, Queso Fresca Round, Queso Dura Viejo Hard Cheeses;


      Amigo: Cuajada En Terron, Cuajada/Cuajadita Cace...

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      Brands of recalled cheeses:

      Mexicana: Cuajada En Terron, Cuajada/Cuajadita Cacera, Cuajada Fresca, Queso Fresca Round, Queso Dura Viejo Hard Cheeses;



      Amigo: Cuajada En Terron, Cuajada/Cuajadita Cacera, Cuajada Fresca, Queso Fresca Round, Queso Dura Viejo Hard Cheeses;



      Santa Rosa De Lima: Cuajada En Terron, Cuajada/Cuajadita Cacera, Cuajada Fresca, Queso Fresca Round, Queso Dura Viejo Hard Cheeses



      Anita Queso Fresco

  • Roos Foods of Kenton has recalled 16 varieties of packaged cheeses after the products were linked to a death in California and caused at least seven others in Maryland to fall ill.
    The cheeses were contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, according to information released Feb. 24 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
    Seven of the eight people sickened by the cheese were hospitalized for treatment, and five cases involved either a newborn or two mother-newborn pairs. The diagnosis of Listeria infections ranged from Aug. 1 to Nov. 27, 2013.
    At least three of five adults associated with the outbreak are known to have eaten cheese produced by Roos, according to the CDC.
    Roos issued a voluntary recall on Feb. 23, according to a statement released by company spokeswoman Virginia Mejia. 
    The cheeses were sold under the brand names Mexicana, Amigo, Santa Rosa De Lima and Anita, and were packaged in 12- and 16-ounce flexible plastic bags and rigid plastic clam-shell packages.
    The products were distributed in retail stores in Washington, D.C., Maryland and Virginia.
    The case first came to light when Virginia authorities tested a cheese curd sample that had been repackaged by a local chain store. The report concluded that sample likely came from Roos.
    A second sample was taken from cheese curd that had not been repackaged and was marked as bring produced by Roos. Both samples contained Listeria.
    The Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services issued its safety warning on Feb. 15.
    Listeria also was found in Roos cheese products bought in Maryland stores; that state issued a warning on Feb. 19.
    The information provided by the CDC did not detail how the California death was related to the outbreak.
    According to the CDC, the Listeria bacteria can grow in cheese at room and refrigerator temperatures and can be spread to other cheeses served on the same cutting board or stored in the same area as contaminated cheeses.
    The CDC says contaminated cheeses should be disposed of immediately and all storage and food preparation areas, including utensils, should be washed and sterilized.
    While there are several strains of Listeria, the monocytogenes is considered the most deadly. The disease primarily affects older adults, pregnant women, newborns and adults with weakened immune systems, although it can sicken those who are otherwise healthy.
    Symptoms include headache, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance and convulsions as well as fever and muscle aches. Pregnant women also can suffer miscarriages, stillbirths, premature delivery or a life-threatening infection of a newborn child.
    Most symptoms appear within two months of being infected, according to CDC reports.
    Treatment involves the use of antibotics.
    Page 2 of 2 - Mejia said customers should destroy all lots of the affected cheeses or return them to the store for a refund.
    Questions should be referred to Mejia at (302) 653-8458.

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