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Smyrna/Clayton Sun-Times
  • Who's game? 'Winter on the Marsh' event cooks up delicacy

  • The Duck Creek Historical Society wants you to see that history is fun. To prove it, they're hosting yet another celebration this weekend, complete with a few tasty treats.
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    • IF YOU GO

      WHAT: "Winter on the Marsh" celebration


      WHERE: Smyrna Museum, 11 S. Main St., Smyrna


      WHEN: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Saturday


      COST: Free


      INFO: (302) 653-1320, ww...

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      IF YOU GO

      WHAT: "Winter on the Marsh" celebration



      WHERE: Smyrna Museum, 11 S. Main St., Smyrna



      WHEN: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Saturday



      COST: Free



      INFO: (302) 653-1320, www.facebook.com/duckcreekhistoricalsociety or @SmyrnaMuseum

  • As spring slowly starts to arrive next month, the Smyrna Museum’s current “Winter on the Marsh” exhibit is will come to a close. First, Duck Creek Historical Society members want to celebrate everything that the season historically has been known for in the area by inviting residents to experience a small piece of what hunters, fishers and trappers know all too well.
    The event begins this weekend with local decoy carvers and duck callers who will illustrate how many water fowl hunters put food on the table. The celebration will also feature a wild game tasting unique to the area.
    “The Wagon Wheel [Restaurant] kindly donated cooked muskrat for people to sample and taste,” said Duck Creek Historical Society member Jess Hansen Herbert, who added that the taste is hard to describe. “Normally, you have to commit to a big plate of it just to try it but we thought it would be fun to give people the opportunity to just sample it if they wanted to.”
    The exhibit will also be open and available for tours. Herbert said that the “winter marsh” collection contains fascinating artifacts that paint a picture of the hunter’s life, including vintage hunting licenses, guns from the 1940s, locally made decoys, foot traps and animal pelts.
    “It’s an eclectic mix of local hunting fare,” she said.
    The exhibits rotate, giving history buffs and newcomers the opportunity to learn more about the area they call home. And, though the museum deals primarily in the past, its members are focused on a few present-day pursuits as well.
    “We’re on Twitter now,” Herbert said, adding that the their latest foray into yet another form of social media means that people now have three ways for keeping up with the museum and the historical society: Facebook (The Duck Creek Historical Society), Twitter (@SmyrnaMuseum) and the museum’s website, which is currently being updated.
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